Jellyfish Help Scientists to Fight Food Fraud

Below is a press release about the Methods paper ‘Stable isotope-based location in a shelf sea setting: accuracy and precision are comparable to light-based location method‘ taken from the University of Southampton.

©Katie St John Glew

©Katie St John Glew

Animals feeding at sea inherit a chemical record reflecting the area where they fed, which can help track their movements, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Southampton.

Chemical testing of the source of marine food products could be a powerful tool to help to fight food fraud, maintain healthy sustainable fish stocks or marine protected areas, and ensure consumer confidence in marine eco-labelling. Continue reading