Genetic Research May Help Trace Chum Salmon to Home Rivers

Below is a press release about the Methods paper ‘Potentially adaptive mitochondrial haplotypes as a tool to identify divergent nuclear loci‘ taken from the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Michael Garvin sails through Auke Bay, just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska. ©Chris Lunsford

Michael Garvin sails through Auke Bay, just north of Juneau in Southeast Alaska. ©Chris Lunsford

University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers have uncovered genetic markers that can help trace chum salmon to the rivers in which they hatched, according to a new paper published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

Mapping out chum salmon pathways could help improve management of the species in Western Alaska, according to Oregon State University Department of Integrative Biology postdoctoral fellow Michael Garvin.

“In some years, chum salmon are frequently the bycatch of pollock fishermen” in the Bering Sea, Garvin explained. “Genetically, chum salmon that originate in Western Alaska tend to look very similar. This makes it difficult for stakeholders because management and conservation efforts to address this bycatch can differ among these regions, but the ability to identify them with genetics is not possible.” Continue reading