2011 top cited papers – part 3

Welcome to part 3 of our review of the most highly cited papers published by Methods in Ecology and Evolution in 2011. In case you missed them, here are part 1 and part 2 of this series.

Population monitoring and management

Climate change

Evolutionary ecology and phylogenomics

2011 top cited papers – part 2

Today we look at part 2 of our most cited papers in Methods in Ecology and Evolution in 2011.

Plant monitoring and modelling

Stable isotope ecology

Community ecology

Our most cited papers on statistical methods in ecology and evolution, modelling species and the environment, and physiological ecology were covered in part 1 – and finally tomorrow we’ll look at our top papers in population monitoring, climate change, evolutionary ecology and phylogenomics.

2011 top cited papers – part 1

Methods in Ecology and Evolution will be receiving its first Impact Factor in summer 2012 and we are very impressed with how well our articles are being cited. For those of you who have been following Methods from the start, you will notice some papers that we have already mentioned last year in our top cited blog posts. These are still going strong! Over the next few days we’ll be highlighting our most cited papers across a broad range of fields – stay tuned on MethodsBlog.

Statistical methods in ecology & evolution

Modelling species and the environment

Parasitology

Physiological ecology

Tomorrow we will be posting part 2, where we’ll be showcasing our top cited papers in plant monitoring and modelling, stable isotope ecology and community ecology, and come back on Wednesday for part 3, when we’ll be revealing our top papers in population monitoring, climate change, evolutionary ecology and phylogenomics.

Accessing Methods in 2012

It’s been two years since the British Ecological Society and Wiley-Blackwell launched Methods in Ecology and Evolution, and the journal has got off to a fantastic start. Tremendous interest in the Society’s youngest publication, and an abundance of high-quality submissions, have led to its switch from quarterly to bi-monthly publication. Authors have proven quick to embrace the use of online technologies to improve the uptake of their new and innovative methodologies, contributing tutorials, source codes and datasets and collaborating with the Methods editorial office for the production of engaging and accessible videos and podcasts. And in February, ISI announced that they would begin indexing Methods’ citations, putting it on track to receive an early impact factor.

For its first year of publication, Methods was made freely available online, while this year libraries have been able to opt-in to receive free, institution-wide access in perpetuity to the first two volumes of the journal and BES members have enjoyed free individual access. However, from January 2012 onwards, Methods will join the four other Society journals and be available on a subscription basis only. BES members will be able to access reduced-rate individual subscriptions.

Methods will still be made available to institutions in developing countries, through the AGORA, OARE and INASP philanthropic initiatives, and the journal will still be able to support authors keen to make their work even more widely available through Open Access publishing. The journal will also be continuing to provide free access to its Application papers – concise, practical descriptions of new software, equipment or other tools. And, of course, our videos, podcasts, and other enhancements designed to encourage and promote the easy dissemination of new advancements will also still be freely available to help promote and drive the development of new methods in ecology and evolution.

Top cited papers – part 3

Welcome back for the final part of our look at the most highly cited papers published by Methods in Ecology and Evolution so far, as recorded by ISI. (Don’t forget to look back at the first two parts, if you missed them previously!)

Population monitoring

Climate change

Evolutionary ecology and phylogenomics

Top cited papers – part 2

Here’s part 2 of our look at Methods in Ecology and Evolution’s most highly cited papers to date!

Plant monitoring and modelling

Stable isotope ecology

Community ecology

We covered statistical methods in ecology and evolution, modelling species and the environment, and physiological ecology in part 1 of our look at our most popular papers so far – and on Monday we’ll be rounding off with our top papers in population monitoring, climate change, evolutionary ecology and phylogenetics.

Top cited papers – part 1

ISI has only been indexing Methods in Ecology and Evolution for a short time, but some of our papers are already accumulating an impressive number of citations. Over the next few days we’ll be highlighting our most cited papers across a broad range of fields – just in case they’ve slipped you by.

Statistical methods in ecology & evolution

Modelling species and the environment

Physiological ecology

Check back tomorrow here for part 2, where we’ll be showcasing our top cited papers in plant monitoring and modelling, stable isotope ecology and community ecology, and come back on Monday for part 3, when we’ll be revealing our top papers in  population monitoring, climate change, evolutionary ecology and phylogenetics.

MEE now to be found on ISI Web of Knowledge

Just a quick post to highlight that Methods in Ecology and Evolution is starting to be indexed on the Web of Knowledge, with 3 of our issues included  for the first time this week in the online database. This is great news: it will make our papers visible to a wide audience and eventually we will get an impact factor. We are already getting lots of downloads, and citation figures from Google Scholar indicate that our papers are being read and used. So hopefully inclusion on WoK will add further to our progress.

Volume 2 Issue 1: Now online

We launched Methods in Ecology in Evolution because we thought that there was a huge demand for methods papers: those doing science need to be kept up to date on new approaches, and those developing new methods need a place to publish, as well as be supported in getting their methods used. Our first volume has exceeded all expectations and we are really pleased to announce that the first issue of volume 2 is online on time and is full of a diverse range top quality papers.

The range of papers in this new issue is extra-ordinary – the scope includes everything from statistics, to energetic modelling and stable isotope methods. The applications of the methods are as varied as measuring food web dynamics, uncovering the drivers of farmland bird declines and the use of phylogenetic methods for reconstructing the history of the molluscs.

One of our big aims is to promote the uptake of methods. On our video and podcast page, we have support for the papers in this issue, including :

In fact almost all of the papers in this issue are supported by either a podcast, a videocast or online supplements. These latter include the user manual explaining how to used the WaderMorph modelling software, amongst others.

This issue contains an important “application” paper: Thomas Etherington gives an outline of the tools he has developed for visualising genetic relatedness in landscape genetics. Look out for more of these, describing the latest software tools, on our Early View page.

We are pleased to see that our papers are beginning to be used: the 10 papers published just a year ago in issue 1 have been cited (according to Google Scholar) a total of 34 times in the first twelve months since publication, i.e. an average of 3.4 times per paper. This is fantastic – for comparison, a journal wilth a Thomson ISI© Impact Factor of 3.4 receives an average of 3.4 citations per paper in the two years following the year of publication.  This is hopefully an indication of good things to come!