Ctenii

Each reconstructed surface is made up of over 18 million three-dimensional points (x, y, and z). This allows for a substantial amount of digital zoom with the ability to still recover surface features. Above is an enlarged view of the posterior margin of a scale from Dascyllus albisella from the same image as the previous two slides. The posterior margin of this scale is made of ctenii, which are small interlocking spines that are present on the scales of many species of fish. Those at the margin are the longest and newest, with older ctenii becoming shortened and serving as a scaffold to interlock with newer ones. Images: Dylan Wainwright and the Freshwater and Marine Image Bank.

Each reconstructed surface is made up of over 18 million three-dimensional points (x, y, and z). This allows for a substantial amount of digital zoom with the ability to still recover surface features. Above is an enlarged view of the posterior margin of a scale from Dascyllus albisella from the same image as the previous two slides. The posterior margin of this scale is made of ctenii, which are small interlocking spines that are present on the scales of many species of fish. Those at the margin are the longest and newest, with older ctenii becoming shortened and serving as a scaffold to interlock with newer ones. Images: Dylan Wainwright and the Freshwater and Marine Image Bank.

Each reconstructed surface is made up of over 18 million three-dimensional points (x, y, and z). This allows for a substantial amount of digital zoom with the ability to still recover surface features. Above is an enlarged view of the posterior margin of a scale from Dascyllus albisella from the same image as the previous two slides. The posterior margin of this scale is made of ctenii, which are small interlocking spines that are present on the scales of many species of fish. Those at the margin are the longest and newest, with older ctenii becoming shortened and serving as a scaffold to interlock with newer ones. Images: Dylan Wainwright and the Freshwater and Marine Image Bank.

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